All of the apologies.
authorDavid Gow <david@ingeniumdigital.com>
Tue, 21 Oct 2014 06:56:50 +0000 (14:56 +0800)
committerDavid Gow <david@ingeniumdigital.com>
Tue, 21 Oct 2014 06:56:50 +0000 (14:56 +0800)
DavidSeminarAbstract [new file with mode: 0644]
cshonours.cls [new file with mode: 0644]
davidfinal.pdf [new file with mode: 0644]
davidfinal.tex [new file with mode: 0644]
papers.bib

diff --git a/DavidSeminarAbstract b/DavidSeminarAbstract
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..17cceb3
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,17 @@
+Precision in vector documents: a spatial approach
+
+Despite being scalable, vector images are typically specified and manipulated
+with fixed-precision numbers. Existing formats therefore are unable to store
+documents which need greater precision, and existing viewers perform coordinate
+system transforms at a fixed precision, limiting the amount any document may be
+"zoomed".
+
+Using existing arbitrary-precision numeric types can resolve these issues, but
+often at a significant or infeasible performance penalty. By taking into
+account the spatial nature of the data, we can store and view documents to an
+arbitrary precision with little-to-no performance impact. This is achieved by
+clipping the document's constituent B├ęzier paths to nodes in a quadtree.
+
+We'll discuss the artefacts caused by low-precision, the theory and
+implementation of our quadtree-based format and some remaining issues and future
+possibilities with the technique.
diff --git a/cshonours.cls b/cshonours.cls
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..c2e0638
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,798 @@
+%%
+%% This is file `cshonours.cls' modified by Cara MacNish from
+%% `report.cls', August 1999.
+%% It is described in more detail in the accompanying example
+%% document, `cshonours.tex'.
+%%
+%% The following refers to the original report.cls.
+%% The original source files were:
+%%
+%% classes.dtx  (with options: `report')
+%% 
+%% This is a generated file.
+%% 
+%% Copyright 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
+%% The LaTeX3 Project and any individual authors listed elsewhere
+%% in this file.
+%% 
+%% This file is part of the LaTeX2e system.
+%% ----------------------------------------
+%% 
+%% It may be distributed under the terms of the LaTeX Project Public
+%% License, as described in lppl.txt in the base LaTeX distribution.
+%% Either version 1.0 or, at your option, any later version.
+%% \CharacterTable
+%%  {Upper-case    \A\B\C\D\E\F\G\H\I\J\K\L\M\N\O\P\Q\R\S\T\U\V\W\X\Y\Z
+%%   Lower-case    \a\b\c\d\e\f\g\h\i\j\k\l\m\n\o\p\q\r\s\t\u\v\w\x\y\z
+%%   Digits        \0\1\2\3\4\5\6\7\8\9
+%%   Exclamation   \!     Double quote  \"     Hash (number) \#
+%%   Dollar        \$     Percent       \%     Ampersand     \&
+%%   Acute accent  \'     Left paren    \(     Right paren   \)
+%%   Asterisk      \*     Plus          \+     Comma         \,
+%%   Minus         \-     Point         \.     Solidus       \/
+%%   Colon         \:     Semicolon     \;     Less than     \<
+%%   Equals        \=     Greater than  \>     Question mark \?
+%%   Commercial at \@     Left bracket  \[     Backslash     \\
+%%   Right bracket \]     Circumflex    \^     Underscore    \_
+%%   Grave accent  \`     Left brace    \{     Vertical bar  \|
+%%   Right brace   \}     Tilde         \~}
+\NeedsTeXFormat{LaTeX2e}[1995/12/01]
+\ProvidesClass{cshonours}
+              [2000/09/13 v1.4a Modified from Standard LaTeX document
+class report.cls by Cara MacNish August 1999/September 2000]
+\newcommand\@ptsize{}
+\newif\if@restonecol
+\newif\if@titlepage
+\@titlepagetrue
+\newif\if@openright
+\if@compatibility\else
+\DeclareOption{a4paper}
+   {\setlength\paperheight {297mm}%
+    \setlength\paperwidth  {210mm}}
+\DeclareOption{a5paper}
+   {\setlength\paperheight {210mm}%
+    \setlength\paperwidth  {148mm}}
+\DeclareOption{b5paper}
+   {\setlength\paperheight {250mm}%
+    \setlength\paperwidth  {176mm}}
+\DeclareOption{letterpaper}
+   {\setlength\paperheight {11in}%
+    \setlength\paperwidth  {8.5in}}
+\DeclareOption{legalpaper}
+   {\setlength\paperheight {14in}%
+    \setlength\paperwidth  {8.5in}}
+\DeclareOption{executivepaper}
+   {\setlength\paperheight {10.5in}%
+    \setlength\paperwidth  {7.25in}}
+\DeclareOption{landscape}
+   {\setlength\@tempdima   {\paperheight}%
+    \setlength\paperheight {\paperwidth}%
+    \setlength\paperwidth  {\@tempdima}}
+\fi
+\if@compatibility
+  \renewcommand\@ptsize{0}
+\else
+\DeclareOption{10pt}{\renewcommand\@ptsize{0}}
+\fi
+\DeclareOption{11pt}{\renewcommand\@ptsize{1}}
+\DeclareOption{12pt}{\renewcommand\@ptsize{2}}
+\if@compatibility\else
+\DeclareOption{oneside}{\@twosidefalse \@mparswitchfalse}
+\fi
+\DeclareOption{twoside}{\@twosidetrue  \@mparswitchtrue}
+\DeclareOption{draft}{\setlength\overfullrule{5pt}}
+\if@compatibility\else
+\DeclareOption{final}{\setlength\overfullrule{0pt}}
+\fi
+\DeclareOption{titlepage}{\@titlepagetrue}
+\if@compatibility\else
+\DeclareOption{notitlepage}{\@titlepagefalse}
+\fi
+\if@compatibility
+\else
+\DeclareOption{openright}{\@openrighttrue}
+\DeclareOption{openany}{\@openrightfalse}
+\fi
+\if@compatibility\else
+\DeclareOption{onecolumn}{\@twocolumnfalse}
+\fi
+\DeclareOption{twocolumn}{\@twocolumntrue}
+\DeclareOption{leqno}{\input{leqno.clo}}
+\DeclareOption{fleqn}{\input{fleqn.clo}}
+\DeclareOption{openbib}{%
+  \AtEndOfPackage{%
+   \renewcommand\@openbib@code{%
+      \advance\leftmargin\bibindent
+      \itemindent -\bibindent
+      \listparindent \itemindent
+      \parsep \z@
+      }%
+   \renewcommand\newblock{\par}}%
+}
+\ExecuteOptions{a4paper,12pt,oneside,onecolumn,final,openany}  %ckm
+\ProcessOptions
+
+\def\@submityear{\number\the\year}              %ckm
+\def\keywords#1{\gdef\@keywords{#1}}           %ckm
+\def\categories#1{\gdef\@categories{#1}}       %ckm
+
+\input{size1\@ptsize.clo}
+\setlength\lineskip{1\p@}
+\setlength\normallineskip{1\p@}
+\renewcommand\baselinestretch{}
+%ckm \setlength\parskip{0\p@ \@plus \p@}
+\setlength\parskip{5\p@ \@plus \p@}
+\@lowpenalty   51
+\@medpenalty  151
+\@highpenalty 301
+\setcounter{topnumber}{2}
+\renewcommand\topfraction{.7}
+\setcounter{bottomnumber}{1}
+\renewcommand\bottomfraction{.3}
+\setcounter{totalnumber}{3}
+\renewcommand\textfraction{.2}
+\renewcommand\floatpagefraction{.5}
+\setcounter{dbltopnumber}{2}
+\renewcommand\dbltopfraction{.7}
+\renewcommand\dblfloatpagefraction{.5}
+\if@twoside
+  \def\ps@headings{%
+      \let\@oddfoot\@empty\let\@evenfoot\@empty
+      \def\@evenhead{\thepage\hfil\slshape\leftmark}%
+      \def\@oddhead{{\slshape\rightmark}\hfil\thepage}%
+      \let\@mkboth\markboth
+    \def\chaptermark##1{%
+      \markboth {\MakeUppercase{%
+        \ifnum \c@secnumdepth >\m@ne
+            \@chapapp\ \thechapter. \ %
+        \fi
+        ##1}}{}}%
+    \def\sectionmark##1{%
+      \markright {\MakeUppercase{%
+        \ifnum \c@secnumdepth >\z@
+          \thesection. \ %
+        \fi
+        ##1}}}}
+\else
+  \def\ps@headings{%
+    \let\@oddfoot\@empty
+    \def\@oddhead{{\slshape\rightmark}\hfil\thepage}%
+    \let\@mkboth\markboth
+    \def\chaptermark##1{%
+%      \markright {\MakeUppercase{%
+      \markright {{%                        %ckm uppercase removed
+        \ifnum \c@secnumdepth >\m@ne
+%            \@chapapp\ \thechapter. \ %
+            \thechapter. \ %                %ckm 'Chapter' removed
+        \fi
+        ##1}}}}
+\fi
+\def\ps@myheadings{%
+    \let\@oddfoot\@empty\let\@evenfoot\@empty
+    \def\@evenhead{\thepage\hfil\slshape\leftmark}%
+    \def\@oddhead{{\slshape\rightmark}\hfil\thepage}%
+    \let\@mkboth\@gobbletwo
+    \let\chaptermark\@gobble
+    \let\sectionmark\@gobble
+    }
+  \if@titlepage
+  \newcommand\maketitle{
+  \pagenumbering{roman}                %ckm
+  \refstepcounter{part}                %ckm
+  \begin{titlepage}%
+  \let\footnotesize\small
+  \let\footnoterule\relax
+  \let \footnote \thanks
+%ckm  \null\vfil
+  \null
+%ckm  \vskip 60\p@
+  \vskip 48\p@
+  \begin{center}%
+%ckm    {\LARGE \@title \par}%
+    {\Large\bf 
+       \parbox{8cm}{                           %ckm
+       \begin{center}\@title\end{center}} \par}%
+%ckm    \vskip 3em%
+    \vskip 0.8em%
+    {\large
+%ckm     \lineskip .75em%
+     \lineskip -0.8em%
+      \begin{tabular}[t]{c}%
+        \@author
+      \end{tabular}\par}%
+      \vskip 1.5em%
+%ckm    {\large Draft \@date \par}%       % Set date in \large size.
+%ckm  \vfil\null
+\vfill
+               {\it This report is submitted as partial fulfilment of\\
+               the requirements for the Software Engineering Programmme of the\\
+               School of Computer Science and Software Engineering,\\
+               The University of Western Australia,\\
+               \@submityear}
+  \end{center}
+%ckm   \par
+%ckm   \@thanks
+  \end{titlepage}%
+  \refstepcounter{page}                %ckm
+  \setcounter{footnote}{0}%
+  \global\let\thanks\relax
+  \global\let\maketitle\relax
+  \global\let\@thanks\@empty
+  \global\let\@author\@empty
+  \global\let\@date\@empty
+  \global\let\@title\@empty
+  \global\let\title\relax
+  \global\let\author\relax
+  \global\let\date\relax
+  \global\let\and\relax
+}
+\else
+\newcommand\maketitle{\par
+  \begingroup
+    \renewcommand\thefootnote{\@fnsymbol\c@footnote}%
+    \def\@makefnmark{\rlap{\@textsuperscript{\normalfont\@thefnmark}}}%
+    \long\def\@makefntext##1{\parindent 1em\noindent
+            \hb@xt@1.8em{%
+                \hss\@textsuperscript{\normalfont\@thefnmark}}##1}%
+    \if@twocolumn
+      \ifnum \col@number=\@ne
+        \@maketitle
+      \else
+        \twocolumn[\@maketitle]%
+      \fi
+    \else
+      \newpage
+      \global\@topnum\z@   % Prevents figures from going at top of page.
+      \@maketitle
+    \fi
+    \thispagestyle{plain}\@thanks
+  \endgroup
+  \setcounter{footnote}{0}%
+  \global\let\thanks\relax
+  \global\let\maketitle\relax
+  \global\let\@maketitle\relax
+  \global\let\@thanks\@empty
+  \global\let\@author\@empty
+  \global\let\@date\@empty
+  \global\let\@title\@empty
+  \global\let\title\relax
+  \global\let\author\relax
+  \global\let\date\relax
+  \global\let\and\relax
+}
+\def\@maketitle{%
+  \newpage
+  \null
+  \vskip 2em%
+  \begin{center}%
+  \let \footnote \thanks
+    {\LARGE \@title \par}%
+    \vskip 1.5em%
+    {\large
+      \lineskip .5em%
+      \begin{tabular}[t]{c}%
+        \@author
+      \end{tabular}\par}%
+    \vskip 1em%
+    {\large \@date}%
+  \end{center}%
+  \par
+  \vskip 1.5em}
+\fi
+\newcommand*\chaptermark[1]{}
+\setcounter{secnumdepth}{2}
+\newcounter {part}
+\newcounter {chapter}
+\newcounter {section}[chapter]
+\newcounter {subsection}[section]
+\newcounter {subsubsection}[subsection]
+\newcounter {paragraph}[subsubsection]
+\newcounter {subparagraph}[paragraph]
+\renewcommand \thepart {\@Roman\c@part}
+\renewcommand \thechapter {\@arabic\c@chapter}
+\renewcommand \thesection {\thechapter.\@arabic\c@section}
+\renewcommand\thesubsection   {\thesection.\@arabic\c@subsection}
+\renewcommand\thesubsubsection{\thesubsection .\@arabic\c@subsubsection}
+\renewcommand\theparagraph    {\thesubsubsection.\@arabic\c@paragraph}
+\renewcommand\thesubparagraph {\theparagraph.\@arabic\c@subparagraph}
+\newcommand\@chapapp{\chaptername}
+\newcommand\part{%
+  \if@openright
+    \cleardoublepage
+  \else
+    \clearpage
+  \fi
+  \thispagestyle{plain}%
+  \if@twocolumn
+    \onecolumn
+    \@tempswatrue
+  \else
+    \@tempswafalse
+  \fi
+  \null\vfil
+  \secdef\@part\@spart}
+
+\def\@part[#1]#2{%
+    \ifnum \c@secnumdepth >-2\relax
+      \refstepcounter{part}%
+      \addcontentsline{toc}{part}{\thepart\hspace{1em}#1}%
+    \else
+      \addcontentsline{toc}{part}{#1}%
+    \fi
+    \markboth{}{}%
+    {\centering
+     \interlinepenalty \@M
+     \normalfont
+     \ifnum \c@secnumdepth >-2\relax
+       \huge\bfseries \partname~\thepart
+       \par
+       \vskip 20\p@
+     \fi
+     \Huge \bfseries #2\par}%
+    \@endpart}
+\def\@spart#1{%
+    {\centering
+     \interlinepenalty \@M
+     \normalfont
+     \Huge \bfseries #1\par}%
+    \@endpart}
+\def\@endpart{\vfil\newpage
+              \if@twoside
+                \null
+                \thispagestyle{empty}%
+                \newpage
+              \fi
+              \if@tempswa
+                \twocolumn
+              \fi}
+\newcommand\chapter{\if@openright\cleardoublepage\else\clearpage\fi
+                    \thispagestyle{plain}%
+                    \global\@topnum\z@
+                    \@afterindentfalse
+                    \secdef\@chapter\@schapter}
+\def\@chapter[#1]#2{\ifnum \c@secnumdepth >\m@ne
+                         \refstepcounter{chapter}%
+                         \typeout{\@chapapp\space\thechapter.}%
+                         \addcontentsline{toc}{chapter}%
+                                   {\protect\numberline{\thechapter}#1}%
+                    \else
+                      \addcontentsline{toc}{chapter}{#1}%
+                    \fi
+                    \chaptermark{#1}%
+                    \addtocontents{lof}{\protect\addvspace{10\p@}}%
+                    \addtocontents{lot}{\protect\addvspace{10\p@}}%
+                    \if@twocolumn
+                      \@topnewpage[\@makechapterhead{#2}]%
+                    \else
+                      \@makechapterhead{#2}%
+                      \@afterheading
+                    \fi}
+\def\@makechapterhead#1{%
+       \ifnum\c@part=\@ne                      %ckm
+               \ifnum\c@chapter=\@ne           %ckm
+               \pagenumbering{arabic}          %ckm
+               \fi                             %ckm
+       \fi                                     %ckm
+%ckm  \vspace*{50\p@}%
+  \vspace*{-30\p@}%   
+  {\parindent \z@ \raggedright \normalfont     %ckm?
+    \ifnum \c@secnumdepth >\m@ne               %ckm?
+%ckm        \huge\bfseries \@chapapp\space \thechapter
+        \large \MakeUppercase{\@chapapp}\space \thechapter        
+        \par\nobreak
+        \vskip 20\p@    %ckm
+    \fi
+    \interlinepenalty\@M
+%ckm    \Huge \bfseries #1\par\nobreak
+    \Huge #1\par\nobreak
+%ckm    \vskip 40\p@
+    \vskip 80\p@
+  }}
+\def\@schapter#1{\if@twocolumn
+                   \@topnewpage[\@makeschapterhead{#1}]%
+                 \else
+                   \@makeschapterhead{#1}%
+                   \@afterheading
+                 \fi}
+\def\@makeschapterhead#1{%
+  \vspace*{-15\p@}%    %ckm
+  {\parindent \z@ \raggedright
+    \normalfont
+    \interlinepenalty\@M
+%ckm    \Huge \bfseries  #1\par\nobreak
+    \Huge #1\par\nobreak
+    \vskip 40\p@
+  }}
+\newcommand\section{\@startsection {section}{1}{\z@}%
+                                   {-3.5ex \@plus -1ex \@minus -.2ex}%
+                                   {2.3ex \@plus.2ex}%
+%ckm                                   {\normalfont\Large\bfseries}}
+                                   {\normalfont\Large}}
+\newcommand\subsection{\@startsection{subsection}{2}{\z@}%
+                                     {-3.25ex\@plus -1ex \@minus -.2ex}%
+                                     {1.5ex \@plus .2ex}%
+%ckm                                     {\normalfont\large\bfseries}}
+                                     {\normalfont\large}}
+\newcommand\subsubsection{\@startsection{subsubsection}{3}{\z@}%
+                                     {-3.25ex\@plus -1ex \@minus -.2ex}%
+                                     {1.5ex \@plus .2ex}%
+%ckm                                     {\normalfont\normalsize\bfseries}}
+                                     {\normalfont\normalsize}}
+\newcommand\paragraph{\@startsection{paragraph}{4}{\z@}%
+                                    {3.25ex \@plus1ex \@minus.2ex}%
+                                    {-1em}%
+                                    {\normalfont\normalsize\bfseries}}
+\newcommand\subparagraph{\@startsection{subparagraph}{5}{\parindent}%
+                                       {3.25ex \@plus1ex \@minus .2ex}%
+                                       {-1em}%
+                                      {\normalfont\normalsize\bfseries}}
+\if@twocolumn
+  \setlength\leftmargini  {2em}
+\else
+  \setlength\leftmargini  {2.5em}
+\fi
+\leftmargin  \leftmargini
+\setlength\leftmarginii  {2.2em}
+\setlength\leftmarginiii {1.87em}
+\setlength\leftmarginiv  {1.7em}
+\if@twocolumn
+  \setlength\leftmarginv  {.5em}
+  \setlength\leftmarginvi {.5em}
+\else
+  \setlength\leftmarginv  {1em}
+  \setlength\leftmarginvi {1em}
+\fi
+\setlength  \labelsep  {.5em}
+\setlength  \labelwidth{\leftmargini}
+\addtolength\labelwidth{-\labelsep}
+\@beginparpenalty -\@lowpenalty
+\@endparpenalty   -\@lowpenalty
+\@itempenalty     -\@lowpenalty
+\renewcommand\theenumi{\@arabic\c@enumi}
+\renewcommand\theenumii{\@alph\c@enumii}
+\renewcommand\theenumiii{\@roman\c@enumiii}
+\renewcommand\theenumiv{\@Alph\c@enumiv}
+\newcommand\labelenumi{\theenumi.}
+\newcommand\labelenumii{(\theenumii)}
+\newcommand\labelenumiii{\theenumiii.}
+\newcommand\labelenumiv{\theenumiv.}
+\renewcommand\p@enumii{\theenumi}
+\renewcommand\p@enumiii{\theenumi(\theenumii)}
+\renewcommand\p@enumiv{\p@enumiii\theenumiii}
+\newcommand\labelitemi{\textbullet}
+\newcommand\labelitemii{\normalfont\bfseries \textendash}
+\newcommand\labelitemiii{\textasteriskcentered}
+\newcommand\labelitemiv{\textperiodcentered}
+\newenvironment{description}
+               {\list{}{\labelwidth\z@ \itemindent-\leftmargin
+                        \let\makelabel\descriptionlabel}}
+               {\endlist}
+\newcommand*\descriptionlabel[1]{\hspace\labelsep
+                                \normalfont\bfseries #1}
+%\if@titlepage
+%  \newenvironment{abstract}{%
+%      \titlepage
+%%ckm      \null\vfil
+%%ckm      \null
+%%ckm      \@beginparpenalty\@lowpenalty
+%%ckm
+%      \chapter*{\abstractname}%
+%%ckm      \begin{center}%
+%%ckm        \bfseries \abstractname
+%%ckm        \@endparpenalty\@M
+%%ckm      \end{center}
+%      }%
+%     {\par\vfil\null
+%      \vfill                                  %ckm
+%      \noindent                               %ckm
+%      {\bf Keywords:} \@keywords \\           %ckm    
+%      {\bf CR Categories:} \@categories       %ckm
+%\endtitlepage}
+%\else
+%  \newenvironment{abstract}{%
+%      \if@twocolumn
+%        \section*{\abstractname}%
+%      \else
+%        \small
+%        \begin{center}%
+%          {\bfseries \abstractname\vspace{-.5em}\vspace{\z@}}%
+%        \end{center}%
+%        \quotation
+%      \fi}
+%      {\if@twocolumn\else\endquotation\fi}
+%\fi
+
+%ckm next two
+
+\newenvironment{abstract}
+       {\chapter*{Abstract}}
+       {\vfill                                 %ckm
+       \noindent                               %ckm
+       {\bf Keywords:} \@keywords \\           %ckm    
+       {\bf CR Categories:} \@categories       %ckm
+       \addcontentsline{toc}{chapter}{Abstract}
+       }
+
+\newenvironment{acknowledgements}
+       {\chapter*{Acknowledgements}}
+       {\addcontentsline{toc}{chapter}{Acknowledgements}}
+
+\newenvironment{verse}
+               {\let\\\@centercr
+                \list{}{\itemsep      \z@
+                        \itemindent   -1.5em%
+                        \listparindent\itemindent
+                        \rightmargin  \leftmargin
+                        \advance\leftmargin 1.5em}%
+                \item\relax}
+               {\endlist}
+\newenvironment{quotation}
+               {\list{}{\listparindent 1.5em%
+                        \itemindent    \listparindent
+                        \rightmargin   \leftmargin
+                        \parsep        \z@ \@plus\p@}%
+                \item\relax}
+               {\endlist}
+\newenvironment{quote}
+               {\list{}{\rightmargin\leftmargin}%
+                \item\relax}
+               {\endlist}
+\if@compatibility
+\newenvironment{titlepage}
+    {%
+      \if@twocolumn
+        \@restonecoltrue\onecolumn
+      \else
+        \@restonecolfalse\newpage
+      \fi
+      \thispagestyle{empty}%
+      \setcounter{page}\z@
+    }%
+    {\if@restonecol\twocolumn \else \newpage \fi
+    }
+\else
+\newenvironment{titlepage}
+    {%
+      \if@twocolumn
+        \@restonecoltrue\onecolumn
+      \else
+        \@restonecolfalse\newpage
+      \fi
+      \thispagestyle{empty}%
+      \setcounter{page}\@ne
+    }%
+    {\if@restonecol\twocolumn \else \newpage \fi
+     \if@twoside\else
+        \setcounter{page}\@ne
+     \fi
+    }
+\fi
+\newcommand\appendix{\par
+       \refstepcounter{part}           %ckm
+  \setcounter{chapter}{0}%
+  \setcounter{section}{0}%
+  \gdef\@chapapp{\appendixname}%
+  \gdef\thechapter{\@Alph\c@chapter}}
+
+\setlength\arraycolsep{5\p@}
+\setlength\tabcolsep{6\p@}
+\setlength\arrayrulewidth{.4\p@}
+\setlength\doublerulesep{2\p@}
+\setlength\tabbingsep{\labelsep}
+\skip\@mpfootins = \skip\footins
+\setlength\fboxsep{3\p@}
+\setlength\fboxrule{.4\p@}
+\@addtoreset {equation}{chapter}
+\renewcommand\theequation
+  {\ifnum \c@chapter>\z@ \thechapter.\fi \@arabic\c@equation}
+\newcounter{figure}[chapter]
+\renewcommand \thefigure
+     {\ifnum \c@chapter>\z@ \thechapter.\fi \@arabic\c@figure}
+\def\fps@figure{tbp}
+\def\ftype@figure{1}
+\def\ext@figure{lof}
+\def\fnum@figure{\figurename~\thefigure}
+\newenvironment{figure}
+               {\@float{figure}}
+               {\end@float}
+\newenvironment{figure*}
+               {\@dblfloat{figure}}
+               {\end@dblfloat}
+\newcounter{table}[chapter]
+\renewcommand \thetable
+     {\ifnum \c@chapter>\z@ \thechapter.\fi \@arabic\c@table}
+\def\fps@table{tbp}
+\def\ftype@table{2}
+\def\ext@table{lot}
+\def\fnum@table{\tablename~\thetable}
+\newenvironment{table}
+               {\@float{table}}
+               {\end@float}
+\newenvironment{table*}
+               {\@dblfloat{table}}
+               {\end@dblfloat}
+\newlength\abovecaptionskip
+\newlength\belowcaptionskip
+\setlength\abovecaptionskip{10\p@}
+\setlength\belowcaptionskip{0\p@}
+\long\def\@makecaption#1#2{%
+  \vskip\abovecaptionskip
+  \sbox\@tempboxa{#1: #2}%
+  \ifdim \wd\@tempboxa >\hsize
+    #1: #2\par
+  \else
+    \global \@minipagefalse
+    \hb@xt@\hsize{\hfil\box\@tempboxa\hfil}%
+  \fi
+  \vskip\belowcaptionskip}
+\DeclareOldFontCommand{\rm}{\normalfont\rmfamily}{\mathrm}
+\DeclareOldFontCommand{\sf}{\normalfont\sffamily}{\mathsf}
+\DeclareOldFontCommand{\tt}{\normalfont\ttfamily}{\mathtt}
+\DeclareOldFontCommand{\bf}{\normalfont\bfseries}{\mathbf}
+\DeclareOldFontCommand{\it}{\normalfont\itshape}{\mathit}
+\DeclareOldFontCommand{\sl}{\normalfont\slshape}{\@nomath\sl}
+\DeclareOldFontCommand{\sc}{\normalfont\scshape}{\@nomath\sc}
+\DeclareRobustCommand*\cal{\@fontswitch\relax\mathcal}
+\DeclareRobustCommand*\mit{\@fontswitch\relax\mathnormal}
+\newcommand\@pnumwidth{1.55em}
+\newcommand\@tocrmarg{2.55em}
+\newcommand\@dotsep{4.5}
+\setcounter{tocdepth}{2}
+\newcommand\tableofcontents{%
+    \if@twocolumn
+      \@restonecoltrue\onecolumn
+    \else
+      \@restonecolfalse
+    \fi
+    \chapter*{\contentsname
+        \@mkboth{%
+           \MakeUppercase\contentsname}{\MakeUppercase\contentsname}}%
+    \@starttoc{toc}%
+    \if@restonecol\twocolumn\fi
+    }
+\newcommand*\l@part[2]{%
+  \ifnum \c@tocdepth >-2\relax
+    \addpenalty{-\@highpenalty}%
+    \addvspace{2.25em \@plus\p@}%
+    \begingroup
+      \parindent \z@ \rightskip \@pnumwidth
+      \parfillskip -\@pnumwidth
+      {\leavevmode
+       \large \bfseries #1\hfil \hb@xt@\@pnumwidth{\hss #2}}\par
+       \nobreak
+         \global\@nobreaktrue
+         \everypar{\global\@nobreakfalse\everypar{}}%
+    \endgroup
+  \fi}
+\newcommand*\l@chapter[2]{%
+  \ifnum \c@tocdepth >\m@ne
+    \addpenalty{-\@highpenalty}%
+    \vskip 1.0em \@plus\p@
+    \setlength\@tempdima{1.5em}%
+    \begingroup
+      \parindent \z@ \rightskip \@pnumwidth
+      \parfillskip -\@pnumwidth
+      \leavevmode \bfseries
+      \advance\leftskip\@tempdima
+      \hskip -\leftskip
+      #1\nobreak\hfil \nobreak\hb@xt@\@pnumwidth{\hss #2}\par
+      \penalty\@highpenalty
+    \endgroup
+  \fi}
+\newcommand*\l@section{\@dottedtocline{1}{1.5em}{2.3em}}
+\newcommand*\l@subsection{\@dottedtocline{2}{3.8em}{3.2em}}
+\newcommand*\l@subsubsection{\@dottedtocline{3}{7.0em}{4.1em}}
+\newcommand*\l@paragraph{\@dottedtocline{4}{10em}{5em}}
+\newcommand*\l@subparagraph{\@dottedtocline{5}{12em}{6em}}
+\newcommand\listoffigures{%
+    \if@twocolumn
+      \@restonecoltrue\onecolumn
+    \else
+      \@restonecolfalse
+    \fi
+    \chapter*{\listfigurename
+      \@mkboth{\MakeUppercase\listfigurename}%
+              {\MakeUppercase\listfigurename}}%
+    \@starttoc{lof}%
+    \if@restonecol\twocolumn\fi
+    }
+\newcommand*\l@figure{\@dottedtocline{1}{1.5em}{2.3em}}
+\newcommand\listoftables{%
+    \if@twocolumn
+      \@restonecoltrue\onecolumn
+    \else
+      \@restonecolfalse
+    \fi
+    \chapter*{\listtablename
+      \@mkboth{%
+          \MakeUppercase\listtablename}{\MakeUppercase\listtablename}}%
+    \@starttoc{lot}%
+    \if@restonecol\twocolumn\fi
+    }
+\let\l@table\l@figure
+\newdimen\bibindent
+\setlength\bibindent{1.5em}
+\newenvironment{thebibliography}[1]
+     {\chapter*{\bibname
+        \@mkboth{\MakeUppercase\bibname}{\MakeUppercase\bibname}}%
+      \list{\@biblabel{\@arabic\c@enumiv}}%
+           {\settowidth\labelwidth{\@biblabel{#1}}%
+            \leftmargin\labelwidth
+            \advance\leftmargin\labelsep
+            \@openbib@code
+            \usecounter{enumiv}%
+            \let\p@enumiv\@empty
+            \renewcommand\theenumiv{\@arabic\c@enumiv}}%
+      \sloppy
+      \clubpenalty4000
+      \@clubpenalty \clubpenalty
+      \widowpenalty4000%
+      \sfcode`\.\@m}
+     {\def\@noitemerr
+       {\@latex@warning{Empty `thebibliography' environment}}%
+      \endlist}
+\newcommand\newblock{\hskip .11em\@plus.33em\@minus.07em}
+\let\@openbib@code\@empty
+\newenvironment{theindex}
+               {\if@twocolumn
+                  \@restonecolfalse
+                \else
+                  \@restonecoltrue
+                \fi
+                \columnseprule \z@
+                \columnsep 35\p@
+                \twocolumn[\@makeschapterhead{\indexname}]%
+                \@mkboth{\MakeUppercase\indexname}%
+                        {\MakeUppercase\indexname}%
+                \thispagestyle{plain}\parindent\z@
+                \parskip\z@ \@plus .3\p@\relax
+                \let\item\@idxitem}
+               {\if@restonecol\onecolumn\else\clearpage\fi}
+\newcommand\@idxitem{\par\hangindent 40\p@}
+\newcommand\subitem{\@idxitem \hspace*{20\p@}}
+\newcommand\subsubitem{\@idxitem \hspace*{30\p@}}
+\newcommand\indexspace{\par \vskip 10\p@ \@plus5\p@ \@minus3\p@\relax}
+\renewcommand\footnoterule{%
+  \kern-3\p@
+  \hrule\@width.4\columnwidth
+  \kern2.6\p@}
+\@addtoreset{footnote}{chapter}
+\newcommand\@makefntext[1]{%
+    \parindent 1em%
+    \noindent
+    \hb@xt@1.8em{\hss\@makefnmark}#1}
+\newcommand\contentsname{Contents}
+\newcommand\listfigurename{List of Figures}
+\newcommand\listtablename{List of Tables}
+\newcommand\bibname{Bibliography}
+\newcommand\indexname{Index}
+\newcommand\figurename{Figure}
+\newcommand\tablename{Table}
+\newcommand\partname{Part}
+\newcommand\chaptername{Chapter}
+\newcommand\appendixname{Appendix}
+\newcommand\abstractname{Abstract}
+\def\today{\ifcase\month\or
+  January\or February\or March\or April\or May\or June\or
+  July\or August\or September\or October\or November\or December\fi
+  \space\number\day, \number\year}
+\setlength\columnsep{10\p@}
+\setlength\columnseprule{0\p@}
+\pagestyle{plain}
+\pagenumbering{arabic}
+\if@twoside
+\else
+  \raggedbottom
+\fi
+\if@twocolumn
+  \twocolumn
+  \sloppy
+  \flushbottom
+\else
+  \onecolumn
+\fi
+
+\addtolength{\textwidth}{21.4pt}       %ckm same width as cshonours.sty
+\endinput
+%%
+%% End of file `report.cls'.
diff --git a/davidfinal.pdf b/davidfinal.pdf
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..51fc408
Binary files /dev/null and b/davidfinal.pdf differ
diff --git a/davidfinal.tex b/davidfinal.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..3e5367e
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,615 @@
+\documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{cshonours}
+\bibliographystyle{acm}
+\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
+\usepackage{hyperref}
+\usepackage{graphicx}
+\usepackage{lastpage}
+\usepackage{fancyhdr}
+%\usepackage{listing}
+\usepackage{subcaption}
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\usepackage{amssymb}
+\usepackage{amsthm}
+\usepackage{minted}
+\pagestyle{fancyplain}
+
+%opening
+\title{Precision in vector documents: a spatial approach}
+\author{David Gow}
+
+\begin{document}
+\cfoot{}
+\lfoot{\thepage\ of \pageref{LastPage}}
+\rfoot{DRAFT}
+\rhead{David Gow (20513694)}
+\lhead{\today}
+
+\maketitle
+
+\tableofcontents
+
+\chapter{Introduction}
+
+Documents are an important part of day-to-day life: we use them for business and pleasure,
+to inform and entertain. We often use images or diagrams to illustrate our ideas, and to convey
+spatial or visual information.
+
+On the printed page, there is a practical limit to the size and resolution of these images.
+In order to store, for example, maps of large areas with fine detail, we resort to an atlas:
+splitting the map up into several pages, each of which covers a different part of the map.
+
+With the advent of computers, we can begin to alleviate these problems. The fixed size and resolution
+of the screen is worked around by having the screen be a \emph{viewport} into a larger document, letting
+the document be \emph{panned} (translated laterally) and \emph{zoomed} (scaled to a particular magnification).
+
+However, limits in the range and precision of the numbers used to store and manipulate documents
+artificially restrict the size and zoom-level of documents. While changing the numeric types used
+can solve these issues, here we investigate the use of a quadtree to take advantage of the spatial
+nature of the data. This is akin to maintaining the atlas of several different pages with different views
+of the map, but with the advantage of greater ease-of-use and continuity.
+
+\chapter{Background}
+
+\section{Rendering}
+
+Computer graphics comes in two forms: bit-mapped (or raster) graphics, which is defined by an array of pixel colours; 
+and \emph{vector} graphics, defined by mathematical descriptions of objects. Bit-mapped graphics are well suited to photographs
+and match how cameras, printers and monitors work. 
+
+
+\begin{figure}[h]
+       \centering \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{figures/vectorraster_example}
+       \caption{\label{vectorraster}A circle as a vector image and a $32 \times 32$ pixel raster image}
+\end{figure}
+
+
+However, bitmap devices do not handle zooming beyond their ``native'' resolution (the resolution where one document pixel maps
+to one display pixel), exhibiting an artefact called pixelation (see Figure \ref{vectorraster}) where the pixel structure becomes evident. Attempts to use
+interpolation to hide this effect are never entirely successful, and sharp edges, such as those found in text and diagrams, are particularly affected.
+
+Vector graphics avoid many of these problems: the representation is independent of the output resolution, and rather
+an abstract description of what is being rendered, typically as a combination of simple geometric shapes like lines,
+arcs and glyphs. 
+
+As existing displays (and printers) are bit-mapped devices, vector documents must be \emph{rasterized} into a bitmap at
+a given resolution.  The resulting bitmap is then an approximation of the vector image
+at that resolution. This bitmap is then displayed or printed.
+
+% Project specific line
+We will discuss the use of vector graphics, as they lend themselves more naturally to scaling,
+though many of the techniques will also apply to raster graphics. Indeed, the use of quadtrees
+to compress bitmapped data is well established\cite{salomon2007data}, and the view-reparenting
+techniques have been used to facilitate an infinite zoom into a (procedurally generated) document\cite{munroe2014pixels}.
+
+\subsection{Rasterizing Vector Graphics}
+
+Before an vector document can be rasterized, the co-ordinates of any shapes must
+be transformed into \emph{screen space} or \emph{viewport space}\cite{blinn1992trip}.
+On a typical display, many of these screen-space coordinates require very little precision or range.
+However, the co-ordinate transform must take care to ensure that precision is preserved during this transform.
+
+After this transformation, the image is decomposed into its separate shapes, which are rasterized
+and then composited together.
+Most graphics formats support Porter-Duff compositing\cite{porter1984compositing}.
+Porter-Duff compositing gives each element (typically a pixel) a ``coverage'' value,
+denoted $\alpha$ which represents the contribution of that element to the final scene.
+Completely transparent elements would have an $\alpha$ value of $0$, and completely opaque
+elements have an $\alpha$ of $1$. This permits arbitrary shapes to be layered over one another
+in the raster domain, while retaining soft-edges.
+
+The rasterization process may then proceed on one object (or shape) at a time. There are special algorithms for rasterizing
+different shapes.
+
+\begin{description}
+       \item[Line Segment]
+       Straight lines between two points are easily rasterized using Bresenham's algorithm\cite{bresenham1965algorithm}.
+       Bresenham's algorithm draws a pixel for every point along the \emph{long} axis of the line, moving along the short
+       axis when the error exceeds $\frac{1}{2}$ a pixel.
+       
+       Bresenham's algorithm only operates on lines whose endpoints lie on integer pixel coordinates. Due to this, line ``clipping''
+       may be performed to find endpoints of the line segment such that the entire line will be on-screen. However, if line clipping is
+       performed na\"ively without also setting the error accumulator correctly, the line's slope will be altered slightly, becoming dependent
+       on the viewport.
+       
+       \item[B\'ezier Curve]
+       A B\'ezier curve is a smooth (i.e.\ infinitely differentiable) curve between two points, represented by a Bernstein polynomial.
+       The coefficients of this Bernstein polynomial are known as the ``control points.''
+       
+       B\'ezier curves are typically rasterized using De Casteljau's algorithm\cite{foley1996computer}
+       Line Segments are a first-order B\'ezier curve. 
+       
+\end{description}
+
+
+%There are special algorithms
+%for rendering lines\cite{bresenham1965algorithm}, triangles\cite{giesen2013triangle}, polygons\cite{pineda1988parallel} and B\'ezier
+%Curves\cite{goldman_thefractal}. 
+
+\subsection{GPU Rendering}
+While traditionally, rasterization was done entirely in software, modern computers and mobile devices have hardware support for rasterizing
+lines and triangles designed for use rendering 3D scenes. This hardware is usually programmed with an
+API like \texttt{OpenGL}\cite{openglspec}.
+
+More complex shapes like B\'ezier curves can be rendered by combining the use of bitmapped textures (possibly using signed-distance
+fields\cite{leymarie1992fast}\cite{frisken2000adaptively}\cite{green2007improved}) strtched over a triangle mesh
+approximating the curve's shape\cite{loop2005resolution}\cite{loop2007rendering}.
+
+Indeed, there are several implementations of entire vector graphics systems using OpenGL: 
+\begin{itemize}
+       \item The OpenVG standard\cite{robart2009openvg} has been implemented on top of OpenGL ES\cite{oh2007implementation};
+       \item the Cairo\cite{worth2003xr} library, based around the PostScript/PDF rendering model, has the ``Glitz'' OpenGL backend\cite{nilsson2004glitz} 
+       \item and the SVG/PostScript GPU renderer by nVidia\cite{kilgard2012gpu} as an OpenGL extension\cite{kilgard300programming}.
+\end{itemize}
+
+
+\section{Numeric formats}
+
+On modern computer architectures, there are two basic number formats supported:
+fixed-width integers and \emph{floating-point} numbers. Typically, computers
+natively support integers of up to 64 bits, capable of representing all integers
+between $0$ and $2^{64} - 1$, inclusive\footnote{Most machines also support \emph{signed} integers,
+which have the same cardinality as their \emph{unsigned} counterparts, but which
+represent integers in the range $[-(2^{63}), 2^{63} - 1]$}.
+
+By introducing a fractional component (analogous to a decimal point), we can convert
+integers to \emph{fixed-point} numbers, which have a more limited range, but a fixed, greater
+precision. For example, a number in 4.4 fixed-point format would have four bits representing the integer
+component, and four bits representing the fractional component:
+\begin{equation}
+       \underbrace{0101}_\text{integer component}.\underbrace{1100}_\text{fractional component} = 5.75
+\end{equation}
+
+
+Floating-point numbers\cite{goldberg1992thedesign, taocp2} are a superset of scientific notation,
+originally used by the Babylonians (in base 60) perhaps as early as 1750 BC.
+Each number $n$ (in a base $\beta$) consists of integers $e$ (the \emph{exponent}) and $m$ (the \emph{mantissa}) such that
+\begin{equation}
+       n = \beta^{e} \times m_f
+\end{equation}
+
+Both $e$ and $m$ typically have a fixed width $q$ and $p$ respectively in base $\beta$. For notational convenience, we also
+represent $m$ as a fraction $m_f = \beta^{-p} m$ so $|m_f| < 1$. We further call a floating point number
+\emph{normalised} if the first digit of $m$ is nonzero. The exponent $e$ is usually allowed to be
+either positive or negative (either by having a sign bit, or being offset a fixed amount). The value
+of a floating point number $n$ must therefore be $-\beta^{e_max} < n < \beta^{e_max}$. The smallest
+possible magnitude of a normalised floating point number is $\beta^{e_min-1}$, as $m_f$ must be at least $0.1$.
+Non-normalised numbers may represent $0$, and many normalised floating-point include zero in some way, too.
+
+The IEEE 754 standard\cite{ieee754std1985} defines several floating-point data types
+which are used\footnote{Many systems implement the IEEE 754 standard's storage formats,
+but do not implement arithmetic operations in accordance with this standard\cite{openglspec, ARBshaderprecision}.} by most
+computer systems. The standard defines 32-bit (8-bit exponent, 23-bit mantissa, 1 sign bit) and 
+64-bit (11-bit exponent, 53-bit mantissa, 1 sign bit) formats\footnote{The 2008
+revision to this standard\cite{ieee754std2008} adds some additional formats, but is
+less widely supported in hardware.}, which can store approximately 7 and 15 decimal digits
+of precision respectively. The IEEE 754 standard also introduces an implicit $1$ bit in the most
+significant place of the mantissa when the exponent is not $e_min$.
+
+Floating-point numbers behave quite differently to integers or fixed-point numbers, as
+the representable numbers are not evenly distributed. Large numbers are stored to a lesser
+precision than numbers close to zero. This can present problems in documents when zooming in
+on objects far from the origin. Furthermore, due to the limited precision, and the different
+``alignment'' of operands in arithmetic, several algebraic properties of rings we take for
+granted in the integers do not exist, including the property of assosciativity\cite{taocp2}.
+
+IEEE floating-point has some interesting features as well, including values for negative zero,
+positive and negative infinity, the ``Not a Number'' (NaN) value and \emph{subnormal} values, which
+trade precision for range when dealing with very small numbers by not normalising
+numbers when the exponent is $e_min$. Indeed, with these values,
+IEEE 754 floating-point equality does not form an equivalence relation, which can cause issues
+when not considered carefully\cite{goldberg1991whatevery}.
+
+There also exist formats for storing numbers with arbitrary precising and/or range.
+Some programming languages support ``big integer''\cite{java_bigint} types which can
+represent any integer that can fit in the system's memory. Similarly, there are
+arbitrary-precision floating-point data types\cite{java_bigdecimal}\cite{boost_multiprecision}
+which can represent any number of the form
+\begin{equation}
+       \frac{n}{2^d} \; \; \; \; n,d \in \mathbb{Z} % This spacing is horrible, and I should be ashamed.
+\end{equation}
+These types are typically built from several native data types such as integers and floats,
+paired with custom routines implementing arithmetic primitives.\cite{priest1991algorithms}
+Operations on these types, therefore, are usually slower than those performed on native types.
+
+Pairs of integers $(a \in \mathbb{Z},b \in \mathbb{Z}\setminus 0)$ can be used to represent rationals. This allows
+values such as $\frac{1}{3}$ to be represented exactly, whereas in fixed or floating-point formats,
+this would have a recurring representation:
+\begin{equation}
+       \underbrace{0}_\text{integer part} . \underbrace{01}_\text{recurring part} 01 \; \; 01 \; \; 01 \dots
+\end{equation}
+Whereas with a rational type, this is simply $\frac{1}{3}$.
+Rationals do not have a unique representation for each value, typically the reduced fraction is used
+as a characteristic element.
+
+While traditionally, GPUs have supported some approximation of IEEE 754's 32-bit floats,
+modern graphics processors also support 16-bit\cite{nv_half_float} and 64-bit\cite{arb_gpu_shader_fp64}
+IEEE floats, though some features of IEEE floats, like denormals and NaNs are not always supported.
+Note, however, that some parts of the GPU are not able to use all formats,
+so precision will likely be truncated at some point before display.
+Higher precision numeric types can be implemented or used on the GPU, but are
+slow.\cite{emmart2010high}
+
+
+\section{Document Formats}
+
+Most existing document formats --- such as the venerable PostScript and PDF --- are, however, designed to imitate
+existing paper documents, largely to allow for easy printing. In order to truly take advantage of the possibilities operating in the digital
+domain opens up to us, we must look to new formats.
+
+Formats such as \texttt{HTML} allow for a greater scope of interactivity and for a more data-driven model, allowing
+the content of the document to be explored in ways that perhaps the author had not anticipated.\cite{hayes2012pixels}
+However, these data-driven formats typically do not support fixed layouts, and the display differs from renderer to
+renderer.
+
+\subsection{A Taxonomy of Document formats}
+
+The process of creating and displaying a document is a rather universal one (\ref{documenttimeline}), though
+different document formats approach it slightly differently. A document often begins as raw content: text and images
+(be they raster or vector) and it must end up as a stream of photons flying towards the reader's eyes.
+
+\begin{figure}
+       \label{documenttimeline}
+       \centering \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{figures/documenttimeline}
+       \caption{\label{doclifecycle}The lifecycle of a document}
+\end{figure}
+
+There are two fundamental stages (as shown in Figure \ref{doclifecycle}) by which all documents --- digital or otherwise --- are produced and displayed:
+\emph{layout} and \emph{rendering}. The \emph{layout} stage is where the positions and sizes of text and other graphics are
+determined. The text will be \emph{flowed} around graphics, the positions of individual glyphs will be placed, ensuring
+that there is no undesired overlap and that everything will fit on the page or screen.
+
+The \emph{display} stage actually produces the final output, whether as ink on paper or pixels on a computer monitor.
+Each graphical element is rasterized and composited into a single image of the target resolution.
+
+
+Different document formats cover documents in different stages of this project. Bitmapped images,
+for example, would represent the output of the final stage of the process, whereas markup languages typically specify
+a document which has not yet been processed, ready for the layout stage. 
+
+Furthermore, some document formats treat the document as a program, written in
+a (usually Turing complete) document language with instructions which emit shapes to be displayed. These shapes are either displayed
+immediately, as in PostScript, or stored in another file, such as with \TeX or \LaTeX, which emit a \texttt{DVI} file. Most other
+forms of document use a \emph{Document Object Model}, being a list or tree of objects to be rendered. \texttt{DVI}, \texttt{PDF},
+\texttt{HTML}\footnote{Some of these formats --- most notably \texttt{HTML} --- implement a scripting lanugage such as JavaScript,
+which permit the DOM to be modified while the document is being viewed.} and SVG\cite{svg2011-1.1}. Of these, only \texttt{HTML} and \TeX typically
+store documents in pre-layout stages, whereas even Turing complete document formats such as PostScript typically encode documents
+which already have their elements placed.
+
+\begin{description}
+       \item[\TeX \, and \LaTeX]
+       Donald Knuth's typesetting language \TeX \, is one of the older computer typesetting systems, originally conceived in 1977\cite{texdraft}.
+       It implements a Turing-complete language and is human-readable and writable, and is still popular
+       due to its excellent support for typesetting mathematics.
+       \TeX only implements the ``layout'' stage of document display, and produces a typeset file,
+       traditionally in \texttt{DVI} format, though modern implementations will often target \texttt{PDF} instead.
+       
+       This document was prepared in \LaTeXe.
+       
+       \item[DVI]
+       \TeX \, traditionally outputs to the \texttt{DVI} (``DeVice Independent'') format: a binary format which consists of a
+       simple stack machine with instructions for drawing glyphs and curves\cite{fuchs1982theformat}.
+       
+       A \texttt{DVI} file is a representation of a document which has been typeset, and \texttt{DVI}
+       viewers will rasterize this for display or printing, or convert it to another similar format like PostScript
+       to be rasterized.
+       
+       \item[HTML]
+       The Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)\cite{html2rfc} is the widely used document format which underpins the
+       world wide web. In order for web pages to adapt appropriately to different devices, the HTML format simply
+       defined semantic parts of a document, such as headings, phrases requiring emphasis, references to images or links
+       to other pages, leaving the \emph{layout} up to the browser, which would also rasterize the final document.
+       
+       The HTML format has changed significantly since its introduction, and most of the layout and styling is now controlled
+       by a set of style sheets in the CSS\cite{css2spec} format.
+       
+       \item[PostScript]
+       Much like DVI, PostScript\cite{plrm} is a stack-based format for drawing vector graphics, though unlike DVI (but like \TeX), PostScript is
+       text-based and Turing complete. PostScript was traditionally run on a control board in laser printers, rasterizing pages at high resolution
+       to be printed, though PostScript interpreters for desktop systems also exist, and are often used with printers which do not support PostScript natively.\cite{ghostscript}
+       
+       PostScript programs typically embody documents which have been typeset, though as a Turing-complete language, some layout can be performed by the document.
+       
+       \item[PDF]
+       Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF)\cite{pdfref17} takes the PostScript rendering model, but does not implement a Turing-complete language.
+       Later versions of PDF also extend the PostScript rendering model to support translucent regions via Porter-Duff compositing\cite{porter1984compositing}.
+       
+       PDF documents represent a particular layout, and must be rasterized before display.
+       
+       \item[SVG]
+       Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is a vector graphics document format\cite{svg2011-1.1} which uses the Document Object Model. It consists of a tree of matrix transforms,
+       with objects such as vector paths (made up of B\'ezier curves) and text at the leaves.
+       
+\end{description}
+
+\subsection{Precision in Document Formats}
+
+Existing document formats --- typically due to having been designed for documents printed on paper, which of course has
+limited size and resolution --- use numeric types which can only represent a fixed range and precision.
+While this works fine with printed pages, users reading documents on computer screens using programs
+with ``zoom'' functionality are prevented from working beyond a limited scale factor, lest artefacts appear due
+to issues with numeric precision.
+
+\TeX uses a $14.16$ bit fixed point type (implemented as a 32-bit integer type, with one sign bit and one bit used to detect overflow)\cite{beebe2007extending}.
+This can represent values in the range $[-(2^{14}), 2^{14} - 1]$ with 16 binary digits of fractional precision.
+
+The DVI files \TeX \, produces may use ``up to'' 32-bit signed integers\cite{fuchs1982theformat} to specify the document, but there is no requirement that
+implementations support the full 32-bit type. It would be permissible, for example, to have a DVI viewer support only 24-bit signed integers, though many
+files which require greater range may fail to render correctly.
+
+PostScript\cite{plrm} supports two different numeric types: \emph{integers} and \emph{reals}, both of which are specified as strings. The interpreter's representation of numbers
+is not exposed, though the representation of integers can be divined by a program by the use of bitwise operations. The PostScript specification lists some ``typical limits''
+of numeric types, though the exact limits may differ from implementation to implementation. Integers typically must fall in the range $[-2^{31}, 2^{31} - 1]$,
+and reals are listed to have largest and smallest values of $\pm10^{38}$, values closest to $0$ of $\pm10^{-38}$ and approximately $8$ decimal digits of precision,
+derived from the IEEE 754 single-precision floating-point specification.
+
+Similarly, the PDF specification\cite{pdfref17} stores \emph{integers} and \emph{reals} as strings, though in a more restricted format than PostScript.
+The PDF specification gives limits for the internal representation of values. Integer limits have not changed from the PostScript specification, but numbers
+representable with the \emph{real} type have been specified differently: the largest representable values are $\pm 3.403\times 10^{38}$, the smallest non-zero representable values are
+$\pm1.175 \times 10^{-38}$ with approximately $5$ decimal digits of precision \emph{in the fractional part}.
+\footnote{The PDF specification mistakenly leaves out the negative in the exponent here.}
+Adobe's implementation of PDF uses both IEEE 754 single precision floating-point numbers and (for some calculations, and in previous versions) 16.16 bit fixed-point values.
+
+The SVG specification\cite{svg2011-1.1} specifies numbers as strings with a decimal representation of the number.
+It is stated that a ``Conforming SVG Viewer'' must have ``all visual rendering accurate to within one device pixel to the mathematically correct result at the initial 1:1
+zoom ratio'' and that ``it is suggested that viewers attempt to keep a high degree of accuracy when zooming.''
+A ``Conforming High-Quality SVG Viewer'' must use ``double-precision floating point\footnote{Presumably the 64-bit IEEE 754 ``double'' type.}'' for computations involving
+coordinate system transformations.
+
+\section{Quadtrees}
+When viewing or processing a small part of a large document, it may be helpful to
+only process --- or \emph{cull} --- parts of the document which are not on-screen.
+
+\begin{figure}[h]
+       \centering \includegraphics[width=0.4\linewidth]{figures/quadtree_example}
+       \caption{A simple quadtree.}
+\end{figure}
+The quadtree\cite{finkel1974quad}is a data structure --- one of a family of \emph{spatial}
+data structures --- which recursively breaks down space into smaller subregions
+which can be processed independently. Points (or other objects) are added to a single
+node which (if certain criteria are met) is split into four equal-sized subregions, and
+points attached to the region which contains them.
+
+Quadtrees have been used in computer graphics for both culling --- excluding objects in
+nodes which are not visible --- and ``level of detail'', where different levels of the quadtree store
+different quality versions of objects or data\cite{zerbst2004game}.
+Typically the number of points in a node
+exceeding a maximum triggers this split, though in our case likely the level of precision required exceeding
+that supported by the data type in use. 
+
+In this project, we will be experimenting with a form of quadtree in which each
+node has its own independent coordinate system, allowing us to store some spatial
+information\footnote{One bit per-coordinate, per-level of the quadtree} within the
+quadtree structure, eliminating redundancy in the coordinates of nearby objects.
+
+Other spatial data structures exist, such as the KD-tree\cite{bentley1975multidimensional},
+which partitions the space on any axis-aligned line; or the BSP tree\cite{fuchs1980onvisible},
+which splits along an arbitrary line which need not be axis aligned. We believe, however,
+that the simpler conversion from binary coordinates to the quadtree's binary split make
+it a better avenue for initial research to explore.
+
+\chapter{\texttt{IPDF}: A Document Precision Playground}
+In order to investigate the precision issues present in document formats and viewers,
+we developed a document viewer \texttt{IPDF}. \texttt{IPDF} is a \texttt{C++} program
+which supports rendering TrueType font outlines and a subset of the \texttt{SVG}
+format.
+
+At its core, \texttt{IPDF} breaks documents down into a set of \emph{objects}, each
+with rectangular bounds $(x, y, w, h)$ and with several \emph{types}:
+\begin{enumerate}
+       \item \textbf{Rectangle:} A simple, axis-aligned rectangle (either filled with a solid colour or
+       left as an outline) covering the object bounds.
+       \item \textbf{Ellipse:} A filled, axis-aligned ellipse, rendered parametrically.
+       \item \textbf{B\'ezier Curve:} A cubic B\'ezier curve. B\'ezier curve
+       control points are stored relative to the coordinate system provided by the
+       document bounds, and several objects can share these coefficients.
+\end{enumerate}
+
+\texttt{IPDF} can be compiled using different number representations, to allow for
+comparison between not only different-precision floating point numbers, but also
+arbitrary-precision types such as rationals.
+
+Documents in \texttt{IPDF} may be rendered either on the CPU, using a custom software
+rasterizer built on the numeric types supported, or on the GPU with OpenGL 3.2 shaders, using
+the GPU's default numeric representation.
+
+Furthermore, \texttt{IPDF} allows \texttt{SVG} files (and text rendered with TrueType fonts) to be inserted at any point and scale in
+the document, allowing for the same images to be compared at different scales.
+
+\section{GPU Floating Point Rounding Behaviour}
+While the IEEE-754 standard specifies both the format of floating-point numbers and the operations they perform.
+However, the OpenGL specification\cite{openglspec}, while requiring the same basic format for single-precision floats,
+does not specify the behaviour of denormals, nor requires any support for NaN or infinite values. Similarly, no support
+for floating point exceptions is required, with the note that no operation should ever halt the GPU.
+
+However, an extension to the specification, \texttt{GL\_ARB\_shader\_precision}\cite{ARBshaderprecision} in 2010
+allows programs to require stricter precision requirements. Notably, support for infinite values is required and
+maximum relative error in ULPs.
+
+Different GPU vendors and drivers have different rounding behaviour, and most hardware (both CPU and GPU) provide
+ways of disabling support for some IEEE features to improve performance\cite{intelgpuspec, dawson2012notnormal}.
+
+\begin{figure}[H]
+\centering
+\includegraphics[width=0.8\textwidth]{figures/circles_gpu_vs_cpu/comparison.pdf}
+\caption{\label{fig:circles}The edges of a unit circle viewed through bounds (x,y,w,h) =  (0.0869386,0.634194,2.63295e-07,2.63295e-07)}
+\end{figure}
+
+Many GPUs now support double-precision floating-point numbers\footnote{Some drivers, however, do not yet support this feature, including one of our test machines.}
+as specified in the \texttt{GL\_ARB\_gpu\_shader\_fp64}\cite{arb_gpu_shader_fp64} OpenGL extension.
+However, many of the fixed-function parts of the GPU do not support double-precision floats, 
+making it impractical to use them.
+
+To see the issues, we rendered the edge of a circle (calculated by discarding pixels with $x^2 + y^2 > 1$) on several GPUs, as well as an \texttt{x86-64} CPU,
+as seen in \autoref{fig:circles}.
+Of these, the nVidia GPU came closest to the CPU rendering, whereas Intel's hardware clearly performs some optimisation which produces quite different artefacts.
+The diagonal distortion in the AMD rendering may be a result of different rounding across the two triangles across which the circle was rendered.
+\section{Distortion and Quantisation at the limits of precision}
+TODO: Fix these figures, explain properly.
+\begin{figure}[h]
+       
+       \begin{subfigure}{.5\linewidth}
+               \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{cpu0}
+               \subcaption{Intended rendering}
+       \end{subfigure}
+       \begin{subfigure}{.5\linewidth}
+               \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{cpu100}
+               \subcaption{With artefacts}
+       \end{subfigure}
+       \caption{\label{fig:precisionerrors}Floating point errors affecting the rendering of an image}
+
+\end{figure}
+
+When trying to insert fine detail into a document using fixed-width floats, some precision is lost. In particular, the
+control points of the curves making up the image get rounded to the nearest\footnote{Other rounding modes are available,
+but they all suffer from similar artefacts.} representable point. \autoref{fig:precisionerrors} shows what happens when an
+image is small enough to be affected by this quantisation. The grid structure becomes very apparent.
+
+These artefacts also become prevalent when an object is far from the origin, as more bits would be required to store the
+position, so the lower order bits of the position must be discarded. As the position of the viewport and the object will share
+many of the same initial digits, catastrophic cancellation\cite{goldberg1991whatevery} can occur.
+
+%\subsection{Big Integers}
+%Computers typically operate on \emph{fixed-width} integers\footnote{The term ``machine word'' has traditionally been used
+%for a CPUs default numeric type, though for historical reasons this is sometimes also used to refer to a 16-bit type, regardless
+%of the preferred type of the underlying machine.} for which they have hardware adders.
+
+%These types are represented by $n$ bits (typically $n$ is 32 or 64), and represents the
+%ring $\mathbb{Z}_n$: i.e.\ any number in the range $[0,2^{n})$ can be represented, and operations
+%are performed $\mod 2^n$.
+\chapter{View Reparenting and the Quadtree}
+One of the important parts of document rendering is that of coordinate transforms.
+
+Traditionally, the document exists in its own coordinate system, $\mathbf{b}$.
+We then define a coordinate system $\mathbf{v}$ to represent the view.
+
+To eliminate visible error due to floating point precision, we need to ensure that
+any point (including control points) must be representable as a float both in the
+document and in view coordinates, i.e:
+\begin{enumerate}
+       \item have a limited magnitude,
+       \item be precise enough to uniquely identify a pixel on the display.
+\end{enumerate}
+
+Despite a point not being representable with floats in one coordinate system,
+it may be representable in another. We can therefore split a document up into
+several coordinate systems, such that each point is completely representable.
+
+Similarly, the points making up the visible document need to all be representable
+(to at least one pixel's worth of precision). To achieve this, we use a quadtree where
+each node stores points within its bounds in its own coordinate system. Objects
+which span multiple nodes are clipped, such that no points\footnote{except some 
+control points} lie outside the quadtree node.
+
+Setting aside the possibility that an object might span multiple nodes for the time
+being, let's investigate how the coordinates of a point are affected by placing it
+in the quadtree.
+
+Suppose $p = (p_x, p_y)$ is a point in a global document coordinate system, which we'll
+consider the root node of our quadtree. $p_x$ and $p_y$ are represented by a finite
+list of binary digits $x_0 \dots x_n$, $y_0 \dots y_n$. 
+Consider now the pair $(x_0, y_0)$:
+\begin{align*}
+       x_0 &= \begin{cases}
+               0 & \text{if }p_x\text{ is in the left half of }d\\
+               1 & \text{if }p_x\text{ is in the right half of }d
+             \end{cases} \\
+       y_0 &= \begin{cases}
+               0 & \text{if }p_y\text{ is in the bottom half of }d\\
+               1 & \text{if }p_y\text{ is in the top half of }d
+             \end{cases}
+\end{align*}
+
+We have therefore found which child node of our quadtree contains $p$. The coordinates
+of $p$ within that node are $(x_1 \dots x_n, y_1 \dots y_n)$. By the principle of mathematical
+induction, we can repeat the process to move more bits from the coordinates of $p$ into the
+structure of the quadtree, until the remaining coordinates may be precisely represented.
+
+This implies that the quadtree is equivalent to an arbitrary precision integer datatype. By reversing
+the process, any point representable in the quadtree can be stored as a fixed-length bit string.
+
+%It is natural to treat these coordinates as being between $0$ and $1$. 
+
+Furthermore, we can get approximations of points by inserting them into higher levels of the quadtree,
+with their coordinates rounded. By then viewing the document at a certain level of the quadtree, we
+then not only do not need to consider bits of precision which are not required to represent the point to
+pixel resolution, we can also cull objects outside the visible nodes at that level. 
+
+Indeed, we can guarantee that, by selecting the level of the quadtree we view such that
+the view width and height lie within the range $(0.5,1]$, we can ensure that at most
+four nodes need to be rendered.
+
+
+\section{Clipping cubic B\'eziers}
+In order to ensure that the quadtree maintains precision in this fashion, we need to ensure
+that all objects are entirely contained within a quadtree node. This is not always the case and,
+indeed, when zooming in on any object, eventually the object will span multiple quadtree nodes.
+
+{\bf TODO: We can show this by showing that, given $(a,b) \in \mathbb{R}, \exists $ binary fraction $c$ such that $a < c < b$.}
+
+We therefore need a way to subdivide objects into several objects, each of which is contained within one node.
+To do this, we need to \emph{clip} the cubic B\'ezier curves from which our document is formed to a rectangle.
+
+Cubic B\'ezier curves are defined parametrically as two cubics: $x(t)$ and $y(t)$, with $0 \leq t \leq 1$.
+We clip these to a rectangular bounding box in stages. We first find the intersections of the curve with
+the clipping rectangle by finding the roots\footnote{While there is a method for solving cubics exactly\cite{cardano1545artis},
+we instead use numeric methods to avoid the need for square root operations, which cannot be done exactly
+on some of the numeric types we used.}
+of the cubic shifted to match the corners of the rectangle. This produces some spurious points, as it assumes the edges
+of the clipping rectangle are lines with infinite extent, but this at worst introduces some minor inefficiency in the process and does
+not affect the result.
+
+Once the values of the parameter $t$ which intersect the clipping rectangle have
+been determined, the curve is split into segments. To do this, the values $0$ and $1$
+(representing the endpoints) are added to the list of intersecting $t$ values, which is then
+sorted. Adjacent values $t_0$ and $t_1$ form a segment. The midpoint of that segment (with the
+value $\frac{t_0 + t_1}{2}$) is evaluate and if it falls
+outside the clipping rectangle, the segment is discarded.
+
+Finally, the segments are re-parametrised by subdividing the curve using De Casteljau's
+algorithm\cite{sederberg2007cad}. By re-parameterising the curves such that $0 \leq t \leq 1$,
+we ensure that the first and last coefficients have the endpoints' coodinates, and therefore
+lie in the quadtree node.
+
+{\bf TODO: Prove that the other control points' magnitude is reduced, and try to quantify it, prove that
+it will never overflow.}
+
+\section{Implementation Details}
+\begin{itemize}
+       \item Store object ID ranges.
+       \item Pointers to children and parent.
+       \item Linked-list of ``overlay'' nodes for mutation.
+       \item Have billions of bugs.
+\end{itemize}
+
+
+
+\chapter{Experimental Results}
+These are all iPython-y at the moment.
+
+Roughly 3s/frame for GMP rationals, 16ms for Quadtree which is still slightly broken.
+\section{Performance per object}
+
+\section{Performance per onscreen object}
+
+\section{Performance per zoom-level}
+
+\section{Stability of performance}
+
+\chapter{Further Work and Conclusion}
+The use of spatial data structures to specify documents with arbitrary precision
+has been validated as a viable alternative to the use of arbitrary precision numeric
+types where an arbitrary (rather than infinite) amount of precision is needed. 
+Once constructed, they are faster in many circumstanced, and the structure
+can also be used for culling. When the viewport moves and scales smoothly, the cost
+of constructing new nodes is amortised over the movement.
+Unfortunately, the mutation of the quadtree is difficult and slow, and discontinuous
+movement can result in a large number of nodes needing to be created.
+
+Quadtree seems to be viable and is really performant.
+
+Loop-blinn shading.
+
+
+\bibliography{papers}
+
+\end{document}
index 362dedf..e6302ae 100644 (file)
@@ -1147,3 +1147,77 @@ ISSN={0164-1239},}
        pages = 69, 
        doi = "10.1016/S1571-0661(05)80215-4"
 }
+
+
+% XKCD comic "pixels"
+@misc{munroe2014pixels,
+author={Munroe, Randall},
+title={Pixels},
+url={http://xkcd.com/1416},
+howpublished={\url{http://xkcd.com/1416/} accessed 2014-09-03},
+journal={xkcd: A webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.}
+year={2014},
+month={September},
+day={3},
+date={2014-09-03},
+number={1416}
+}
+
+% GL_ARB_shader_precision
+@misc{ARBshaderprecision,
+author={Kessenich, John},
+title={{GL\_ARB\_shader\_precision}},
+year={2010},
+howpublished={\url{https://www.opengl.org/registry/specs/ARB/shader_precision.txt} accessed 2014-10-17}
+}
+
+@article{intelgpuspec,
+author={Intel Corporation},
+title={{3D/Media --- 3D Pipeline (Ivy Bridge)}},
+journal={{Intel OpenSource HD Graphics Programmer's Reference Manual (PRM)}},
+year={2012},
+url={https://01.org/linuxgraphics/sites/default/files/documentation/ivb_ihd_os_vol2_part1.pdf},
+volume={2},
+number={1}
+}
+
+@misc{dawson2012notnormal,
+author={Dawson, Bruce},
+title={{That's Not Normal --- the Performance of Odd Floats}},
+year={2012},
+howpublished={\url{https://randomascii.wordpress.com/2012/05/20/thats-not-normalthe-performance-of-odd-floats/} accessed 2014-10-18}
+}
+
+# Original cubic solution
+@misc{cardano1545artis,
+author={Cardano, Gerolamo},
+title={Artis magnae sive de regulis agebraicis: liber unus},
+year={1545}
+}
+
+@misc{sederberg2007cad,
+author={Sederberg, T. W.},
+title={Computer Aided Geometric Design Course Notes},
+year={2007}
+}
+
+@book{salomon2007data,
+  title={Data Compression: The Complete Reference},
+  author={Salomon, D. and Motta, G. and Bryant, D.},
+  isbn={9781846286032},
+  lccn={2006931789},
+  series={Molecular biology intelligence unit},
+  url={http://books.google.com.au/books?id=ujnQogzx\_2EC},
+  year={2007},
+  publisher={Springer}
+}
+
+@book{taocp2,
+       title={Seminumerical Algorithms},
+       author={Knuth, Donald},
+       year={1998},
+       volume={2},
+       series={The Art of Computer Programming},
+       publisher={Addison--Wesley},
+       edition={3rd}
+}
\ No newline at end of file

UCC git Repository :: git.ucc.asn.au