Happy thoughts... Happy thoughts!
authorDavid Gow <david@ingeniumdigital.com>
Mon, 19 May 2014 02:25:54 +0000 (10:25 +0800)
committerDavid Gow <david@ingeniumdigital.com>
Mon, 19 May 2014 02:25:54 +0000 (10:25 +0800)
LitReviewDavid.pdf
LitReviewDavid.tex
papers.bib

index 4949e4d..1e0bb5e 100644 (file)
Binary files a/LitReviewDavid.pdf and b/LitReviewDavid.pdf differ
index 532017b..a8947e8 100644 (file)
@@ -3,6 +3,7 @@
 \usepackage{hyperref}
 \usepackage{graphicx}
 \usepackage{amsmath}
+\usepackage{amssymb}
 
 %opening
 \title{Literature Review}
@@ -42,7 +43,7 @@ a turing complete document language with instructions which emit shapes to be di
 immediately, as in PostScript, or stored in another file, such as with \TeX or \LaTeX, which emit a \texttt{DVI} file. Most other
 forms of document use a \emph{Document Object Model}, being a list or tree of objects to be rendered. \texttt{DVI}, \texttt{PDF},
 \texttt{HTML}\footnote{Some of these formats --- most notably \texttt{HTML} --- implement a scripting lanugage such as JavaScript,
-which permit the DOM to be modified while the document is being viewed.} and SVG. Of these, only \texttt{HTML} and \TeX typically
+which permit the DOM to be modified while the document is being viewed.} and SVG\cite{svg2011-1.1}. Of these, only \texttt{HTML} and \TeX typically
 store documents in pre-layout stages, whereas even turing complete document formats such as PostScript typically encode documents
 which already have their elements placed.
 
@@ -59,7 +60,7 @@ and \emph{vector} graphics, defined by mathematical descriptions of objects. Bit
 and are match how cameras, printers and monitors work. However, bitmap devices do not handle zooming beyond their
 ``native'' resolution --- the resolution where one document pixel maps to one display pixel ---, exhibiting an artefact
 called pixelation where the pixel structure becomes evident. Attempts to use interpolation to hide this effect are
-never entirely successful, and sharp edges, such as those found in text and diagrams, are particularly effected.
+never entirely successful, and sharp edges, such as those found in text and diagrams, are particularly affected.
 
 \begin{figure}[h]
        \centering \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{figures/vectorraster_example}
@@ -96,7 +97,7 @@ the Cairo\cite{worth2003xr} library, based around the PostScript/PDF rendering m
 renderer by nVidia\cite{kilgard2012gpu} as an OpenGL extension\cite{kilgard300programming}.
 
 
-\section{Floating-Point Precision}
+\section{Numeric formats}
 
 On modern computer architectures, there are two basic number formats supported:
 fixed-width integers and \emph{floating-point} numbers. Typically, computers
@@ -135,12 +136,27 @@ precision than numbers close to zero. This can present problems in documents whe
 on objects far from the origin.
 
 IEEE floating-point has some interesting features as well, including values for negative zero,
-positive and negative infinity and the ``Not a Number'' (NaN) value. Indeed, with these values,
+positive and negative infinity, the ``Not a Number'' (NaN) value and \emph{denormal} values, which
+trade precision for range when dealing with very small numbers. Indeed, with these values,
 IEEE 754 floating-point equality does not form an equivalence relation, which can cause issues
 when not considered carefully.\cite{goldberg1991whatevery}
 
-Arb. precision exists
+There also exist formats for storing numbers with arbitrary precising and/or range.
+Some programming languages support ``big integer''\cite{java_bigint} types which can
+represent any integer that can fit in the system's memory. Similarly, there are
+arbitrary-precision floating-point data types\cite{java_bigdecimal}\cite{boost_multiprecision}
+which can represent any number of the form
+\begin{equation}
+       \frac{n}{2^d} \; \; \; \; n,d \in \mathbb{Z} % This spacing is horrible, and I should be ashamed.
+\end{equation}
+These types are typically built from several native data types such as integers and floats,
+paired with custom routines implementing arithmetic primitives.\cite{priest1991algorithms}
+These, therefore, are likely slower than the native types they are built on.
+
 
+While traditionally, GPUs have supported some approximation of IEEE 754's 32-bit floats,
+modern graphics processors also support 16-bit\cite{nv_half_float} and 64-bit\cite{arb_gpu_shader_fp64}
+IEEE floats. 
 Higher precision numeric types can be implemented or used on the GPU, but are
 slow.
 \cite{emmart2010high}
index c735181..06b6f48 100644 (file)
@@ -95,6 +95,25 @@ Goldberg:1991:CSK:103162.103163,
  address = {New York, NY, USA},
  keywords = {NaN, denormalized number, exception, floating-point, floating-point standard, gradual underflow, guard digit, overflow, relative error, rounding error, rounding mode, ulp, underflow},
 } 
+
+@misc{arb_gpu_shader_fp64,
+  title={{ARB\_gpu\_shader\_fp64}},
+  author={Brown, Pat and Lichtenbelt, Barthold and Licea-Kane, Bill and Merry, Bruce and Dodd, Chris and Werness, Eric and Sellers, Graham and Roth, Greg and Bolz, Jeff and Haemel, Nick and Boudier, Pierre and Daniell, Piers},
+  year={2010},
+  journal={OpenGL Extension},
+  publisher={Kronos Group},
+  howpublished={\url{http://www.opengl.org/registry/specs/ARB/gpu_shader_fp64.txt}}
+}
+
+@misc{nv_half_float,
+  title={{NV\_half\_float}},
+  author={Brown, Pat},
+  year={2002},
+  journal={OpenGL Extension},
+  publisher={NVIDIA Corporation},
+  howpublished={\url{http://www.opengl.org/registry/specs/NV/half_float.txt}}
+}
+
 @inproceedings{emmart2010high,
   title={High precision integer multiplication with a graphics processing unit},
   author={Emmart, Niall and Weems, Charles},
@@ -513,6 +532,22 @@ doi={10.1109/ARITH.1991.145549},}
        howpublished = {\url{http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_53_0/libs/multiprecision/doc/html/boost_multiprecision/}}
 }
 
+@misc{java_bigint,
+       author = {Oracle Corporation},
+       title = {java.math.{BigInteger}},
+       booktitle = {Java Platform 6 {SE}},
+       urldate = {19-05-2014},
+       howpublished = {\url{http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/math/BigInteger.html}}
+}
+
+@misc{java_bigdecimal,
+       author = {Oracle Corporation},
+       title = {java.math.{BigDecimal}},
+       booktitle = {Java Platform 7 {SE}},
+       howpublished = {\url{http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/math/BigDecimal.html}},
+       urldate = {19-05-2014}
+}
+
 % A CMOS Floating Point Unit
 @MISC{kelley1997acmos,
     author = {Michael J. Kelley and Matthew A. Postiff and Advisor Richard and B. Brown},

UCC git Repository :: git.ucc.asn.au